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LADY ANNE'S WAY

Nine day version

 

STAGE ONE - SKIPTON TO  HEBDEN

Distance  13.75 miles

The day ends at Hebden, once a lead mining village, whose tiny cottages  housed the miners and their families. In the 18th. century the main route through the village, which was turnpiked at that time, would have been busy with people transporting lead. In earlier times the road was part of a monastic route used by the monks of Fountains Abbey to transport fleeces from their granges in Wharfedale back to the abbey.
Facilities: There is a cafe, B&B's and the Clarendon Hotel where meals and accommodation are available.

 

STAGE TWO - HEBDEN TO BUCKDEN

Distance 14.25 miles

In Norman times Buckden was the main hunting headquarters for the Percy family, who owned a great chase in this area which covered most of Langstrothdale. Ten hunting lodges were set up, whilst Buckden itself was used to house the Percy's foresters.
Facilities: There is a village shop (open 7 days, usually 8.0am.-4.30pm. Wed. 8.0.am. - 11.0am. where pack-up can be ordered the day before)  B&B's, a camping & pod site, cafe & walker's lodge and The Buck Inn where meals and accommodation are available.  

STAGE THREE - BUCKDEN TO ASKRIGG

Distance 12.25 miles

Askrigg, a medieval settlement, was granted a market and two fairs in 1587, however in 1699 Hawes was granted its own market charter and Askrigg's trading fate was sealed. The town lay on the route of a major drove road which came over the moors from Wensleydale, through Askrigg and then on up the Roman Road from Bainbridge, over Cam Fell and on into Ribblesdale.
Facilities: B&B's, pubs, hotels plus limited camping.

 

STAGE FOUR - ASKRIGG TO HAWES  #

Distance 5.75 miles

Hawes is one of England's highest market towns, famous for its cheese, (Wallace and Gromit have a lot to answer for!) its working ropemakers and its Dales Countryside Museum. Also famous as the centre for the Quaker movement in the 17th. and 18th. centuries, Hawes can boast a Quaker rest house in the main street.
Facilites: All amenities can be found in Hawes.

 

STAGE FIVE - HAWES TO  NATEBY  #

Distance 15.5 miles

The hamlet of Outhgill is the only group of houses along the five mile length of Mallerstang.  The tiny church here is one of the many buildings restored by Lady Anne. The buildings of Outhgill Farm were once the Kings Head, but that was many years ago.
Facilities: Sadly the B & B in Outhgill has closed & the nearest accommodation at present is at Nateby approx. 3 miles further on, where food & accomm. are available at Nateby Inn.

Alternatively this stage could be broken at The Moorcock Inn, Garsdale, by dropping down off the Highway along part of the Pennine Bridleway. (Just over 1 mile off the route)

 

# If choosing to drop down to the Moorcock from the Highway, (Stage Five) the walk from Askrigg could be extended through Hawes to the Moorcock (12.25 miles).

This would then make the walk to Kirkby Stephen a 12 mile one leaving an easy walk to Church Brough the following day.
 

STAGE SIX - NATEBY TO CHURCH BROUGH

Distance  8 miles

Church Brough and Market Brough now lie either side of the A65 Brough bypass. Church Brough itself is a medieval village nestling between the church and the castle. Brough itself is the old assize and market town.  Brough Hill, on the outskirts of the village, is the venue for the annual fair. This event was once the biggest horse fair in the North of England and has been held since the 13th. century. Brough grew up around an important Roman Camp and subsequently a Norman Castle.
Facilities: An ice-cream parlour/cafe in Ch. Brough at the Castle. There are shops, two B&B's one pub and a luxury AA5 star Inn with a rosette winning restaurant in Market Brough

 

STAGE SEVEN - CHURCH BROUGH TO APPLEBY

Distance 10.25 miles

Appleby is a beautiful town guarded by its Castle Keep. Unfortunately the Great Picture of the Clifford family is no longer here. A trip to Abbott Hall in Kendal is now necessary to view it. However the lovely red sandstone almshouses are there, part way down the main street and well worth a visit. As is the Parish Church of St. Lawrence where Lady Anne is buried.
Facilities: Appleby has all the amenities including a luxury hotel & garden spa.

 

STAGE EIGHT

APPLEBY  TO OUSENSTAND BRIDGE 

Distance 8.25 miles

Accommodation now available at Kirkby Thore through which the route passes. The village is 1.25 miles short of Ousenstand Br. It can boast a medieval hall but also the site of a Roman fort, north-west of the main street.

Temple Sowerby (1.25 miles off route) is a mixture of 16th century rubble and thatch buildings intermingled with 18th and 19th century buildings set around a village green. It can lay claim to being one of the few Westmorland villages which still retains its maypole and derives its name from the religious and military order called the Knights Templar. The road through the village is on the line of the Roman road from York to Brougham and a remnant of this period lies half a mile south east of the village, namely a Roman milestone, standing on its original site.
Facilities:

Long Marton - Masons Arms in the village serves food & drink

Kirkby Thore - a B & B & Bridge Cafe Bistro.

Temple Sowerby - One hotel plus The Kings Arms and a B&B. 

Skygarth Farm B & B (just over 0.5 miles off route & hey will run you to the pub at Temple Sowerby)
 

 

STAGE NINE

OUSENSTAND BRIDGE TO PENRITH

Distance 11.25 miles


Penrith was once the capital of Cumbria and marks the gateway to the Lake District and the North Pennines. There is much of architectural interest in the town and many yards linking the main thoroughfares are worth an exploration. Little is left of the sandstone castle but it is worth searching out the four hogback stones and ancient cross in St. Andrews churchyard close by.
Facilities: All amenities are available in Penrith


DON'T FORGET YOUR BADGE!   See 'Guide Book' page for details.